Friday, October 17, 2014

Why You Do Or Don't Buy Handmade Soap





Soap has always been my main focus 

since the beginning and I love making 


soap but as of lately, most of my sales


 pretty go to my other items so I want 


to know why people buy or don't buy 


handmade soaps. 




Is it because..

A) handmade soaps are pretty and smell good

B) that is is better for your skin

C) You have skin allergies or skin conditions

D) You just don't buy handmade soap


E) handmade soaps are too expensive to buy

F) Other (please specify)

I would love to hear why you do or don't buy handmade soaps in the comments below. 

Thank you in advance.
Michelle

Sunday, October 12, 2014

What Is The Best Cereals To Eat

DietDetective.com says it evaluated 301 cereals and has ranked them by healthiness. 

The findings were based on 19 criteria, including things like calories, sugar and sodium per serving. 

According to their evaluation, here are the Top 10 "Healthiest" cereals: 

1.    Nature's Path Organic Millet Puffs  
2.    Barbara's Shredded Wheat
3.    Kashi Whole Wheat Biscuits Autumn Wheat (Tied for 3rd place)
3.    Quaker Oats Old Fashioned (Tied for 3rd place)
5.    Nature's Path Oatmeal Gluten Free Selections Homestyle
6.    Kashi  7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs
7.    Post Shredded Wheat Original Spoon Size
8.    Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Original Flavor
9.    Post Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Wheat'n Bran
10.  Nature's Path Original Hot Oatmeal 

I wonder why Cherrios is not added to this list. ???

Top 10 "Unhealthiest" cereals: 

1.      General Mills Monsters Boo Berry (Tied for last place)
1.      Kellogg's Rice Krispies Treats (Tied for last place)
1.      Post Fruity Pebbles (Tied for last place)
1.      Post Summer Berry Pebbles (Tied for last place)
1.      General Mills Chocolate Lucky Charms (Tied for last place)
6.      Kellogg's Rice Krispies Cocoa Krispies
7.      General Mills Cinnamon Toast Crunch Frosted Toast Crunch
8.      Kellogg's Frosted Flakes        
9.      Quaker   Honey Graham Oh's      
10.    Kellogg's Granola Low-fat Granola Multigrain with Raisins

DietDetective says go for cereals with the fewest ingredients, and to make sure they're all ingredients you can pronounce. 

Cereals with Fewest Calories Per Gram
 
This is one of the better ways of comparing cereals, particularly because the serving size and density differ from one to another.  The cereal with the fewest calories per gram is listed first.  All the cereals on the list have fewer calories per gram than 291 others.  
 
1.     Kashi   7 Whole Grain Cereals Good Friends, Original, 1.13 calories per gram of cereal
2.     General Mills Fiber One, 2.0 calories per gram of cereal
3.     Kellogg’s All-Bran, 2.58 calories per gram of cereal
4.     General Mills Fiber One 80 Calories Honey Squares, 2.67 calories per gram of cereal
4.     Nature's Path Organic SmartBran Cereal, 2.67 calories per gram of cereal
4.     General Mills Fiber One 80 Calories Chocolate Squares, 2.67 calories per gram of cereal
4.     Kellogg’s All-Bran Bran Buds, 2.67 calories per gram of cereal
8.     Barbara's Puffins Cinnamon Puffins, 3.0 calories per gram of cereal
9.     General Mills Total Raisin Bran, 3.02 calories per gram of cereal
10.  Kashi GoLean Original, 3.08 calories per gram of cereal
 
Cereals with the Most Calories Per Gram
 
This is one of the better ways of comparing cereals, particularly because the serving size and density differ from one to another. The cereal with the most calories per gram is listed first. All the cereals listed here have more calories per gram than 290 other cereals.
 
-       Nature's Path Love Crunch Dark Chocolate Macaroon, 5.0 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Love Crunch Aloha Blend, 5.0 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Chia Plus Granola, Chia Plus Coconut Chia Granola, 4.90 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Granola Peanut Butter Granola, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Hemp Plus Granola, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Granola Pumpkin Flax Plus Granola, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood. Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Original Flavor, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal of cereal
-       Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Cereal Cranberry Vanilla, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Love Crunch Dark Chocolate & Red Berries, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Love Crunch Apple Crumble, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
-       Nature's Path Granola Gluten Free Selections Fruit and Nut Granola, 4.7 calories per gram of cereal
 
Cereals with the Fewest Calories Per Serving   
 
-       Nature's Path Organic Millet Puffs, 50 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Organic Rice Puffs, 50 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Organic Kamut Puffs, 50 calories per serving
-       Quaker Puffed Wheat,  50 calories per serving
-       Quaker Puffed Rice, 50 calories per serving
-       Kashi 7 Whole Grain Cereals, Good Friends, Original, 60 calories per serving
-       General Mills Fiber One, 60 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Organic Corn Puffs, 60 calories per serving
-       Kashi   7 Whole Grain Cereals, Puffs, 70 calories per serving
-       Kellogg’s All-Bran, 80 calories per serving
 
Cereals with the Most Calories Per Serving   
 
 
-       Nature's Path Chia Plus Coconut Chia Granola, 270 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Hemp Plus Granola, 260 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Pumpkin Flax Plus Granola, 260 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Peanut Butter Granola,  260 calories per serving
-       General Mills Cascadian Farm Dark Chocolate Almond Granola, 250 calories per serving
-       Post Honey Bunches of Oats, Just Bunches! Honey Roasted,  250 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Granola Pomegranate Cherry Granola, 250 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Kirkland Signature Ancient Grains Granola with Almonds, 250 calories per serving
-       Nature's Path Granola Vanilla Almond Flax Plus Granola, 250 calories per serving
-       General Mills Cascadian Farm French Vanilla Almond Granola , 240 calories per serving
 
NO-Sugar Cereals
 
The following cereals contain NO sugar.
 
-       General Mills Fiber One
-       Quaker Puffed Rice   
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Unfrosted Bite Size
-       Post Shredded Wheat Original Big Biscuit
-       Kashi   7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs
-       Nature's Path Oatmeal Gluten Free Selections Homestyle
-       Nature's Path Organic Corn Puffs
-       Quaker Puffed Wheat
-       Post Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Wheat'n Bran
-       Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood, Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Original Flavor
-       Post Shredded Wheat Original Spoon Size
-       Nature's Path Organic Millet Puffs
-       Barbara's Shredded Wheat
-       Nature's Path Organic Rice Puffs
-       Nature's Path Organic Kamut Puffs
 
Cereals with the Most Grams of Sugar Per Gram
 
This is one of the better ways of comparing cereals because it eliminates variations in serving size. The cereal with the most grams of sugar per gram is listed first.  The cereals listed below have more sugar per gram than 289 other cereals we investigated.
 
-       Kellogg’s Honey Smacks, 0.56g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Post Golden Crisp, 0.52g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s Froot Loops Marshmallow 0.48g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Quaker Honey Graham Oh’s, 0.44g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Quaker Quisp, 0.44g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s Apple Jacks, 0.43g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s Froot Loops, 0.40g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s Rice Krispies Frosted Krispies, 0.40g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Post Waffle Crisp, 0.40g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes Choco Zucaritas Chocolate, 0.40g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s New Option Cinnabon, 0.40g of sugar per gram of cereal
-       Kellogg’s Froot Loops Treasures, 0.40g of sugar per gram of cereal
 
NO-Sodium Cereals  
 
According to their labels, the following cereals contain NO sodium.
 
-       Kashi Whole Wheat Biscuits Berry Fruitful Cereal
-       Nature's Path Organic Rice Puffs
-       Nature's Path Organic Millet Puffs
-       Nature's Path Organic Kamut Puffs
-       Kashi Whole Wheat Biscuits Cinnamon Harvest
-       Quaker  Oats Old Fashioned
-       Kashi Whole Wheat Biscuits Autumn Wheat
-       Quaker Puffed Wheat
-       Post Shredded Wheat Spoon Size Wheat'n Bran
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Big Bite
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Unfrosted Bite Size
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Touch of Fruit in the Middle Raisin
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Blueberry
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Strawberry
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Maple Brown Sugar
-       Post Shredded Wheat Original Spoon Size
-       Barbara's Shredded Wheat    
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Bite Size
-       Quaker Puffed Rice   
-       Kellogg’s Frosted Mini-Wheat Little Bites Original
-       Kashi   7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs
-       Quaker  Quisp
-       Nature's Path Organic Corn Puffs
-       Nature's Path Original Hot Oatmeal
-       Kashi   7 Whole Grain Cereals Honey Puffs
-       Nature's Path Oatmeal Gluten Free Selections Homestyle
-       Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood, Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Cereal Apple Cinnamon
-       Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood, Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Original Flavor
-       Nature's Path Qi'a Superfood, Chia, Buckwheat & Hemp Cereal Cranberry Vanilla
-       Nature's Path Granola, Gluten Free Selections Fruit and Nut Granola
 
Cereals with the Most Milligrams of Sodium Per Gram
 
This is one of the better ways of comparing cereals because it eliminates variations in serving size.  The cereal with the most sodium per gram is listed first.  The cereals on this list have more sodium per gram than 291 other cereals.
 
1.     Quaker  King Vitamin, 8.39mg of sodium per gram
2.     General Mills Chex Rice Chex, 8.15mg of sodium per gram
3.     Quaker  Crunch Corn Bran Crunch, 7.78mg of sodium per gram
4.     Barbara's Classics Peanut Butter Puffins, 7.67mg of sodium per gram
5.     Kellogg’s Product 19, 7.33mg of sodium per gram
6.     Kellogg’s All-Bran Complete Wheat Flakes, 7.24mg of sodium per gram
7.     Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, 7.14mg of sodium per gram
8.     General Mills Chex Corn Chex, 7.10mg of sodium per gram
9.     Barbara's Puffins Original Puffins, 7.04mg of sodium per gram
9.     General Mills Wheaties, 7.04mg of sodium per gram
 
Cereal Averages:
 
Here is a quick look at the nutritional content of an average bowl of cereal:
 
-Average calories per serving: 150 (no more than 2,000 calories per day for average person)
-Average sodium milligrams per serving: 127 (recommendations are no more than 2,300mg per day)
-Average carb grams per serving: 31.18 (A recent study showed that a diet of less than 40 grams of carbohydrate per day works better for weight control than a low-fat diet)
-Average sugar grams per serving: 8.46 (equal to about 2 teaspoons of sugar)
-Average protein grams per serving: 3.66 (Women ages 19 – 70+ should get 46g;  Men ages 19 – 70+ should get 56g per day)
-Average dietary fiber per serving: 3.83g (recommended to consume 28 grams of dietary fiber in whole foods for the average person consuming 2,000 calories per day)
 
Cereal Healthy Eating Tips
 
 Stick with Low Calories: Choose cereals that are low in calories per gram. To find this number, divide the number of calories in a serving by the number of grams per serving listed on the nutritional label. 
 
— Watch the Sodium: Many cereals are high in sodium; the Institute of Medicine recommends no more than 1,500 mg of sodium per day.
 
— Avoid Added Sugar: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the term “added sugar” is defined as any “sweeteners added to processed and prepared foods.” While many sugars are found naturally in foods such as milk, fruit, vegetables and grains, it’s the sugars added to many of the foods we eat (by food companies) that we have to watch out for.  Remember, regardless of the name, whether it’s honey (although there is some research that indicates honey can help with allergies and work as an antibiotic), brown sugar, raw sugar or maple syrup, all added sugar essentially adds calories without significant nutritional value.  Molasses may be the one exception, because it is actually a fair source of potassium, calcium and iron.
 
When you read a food label, look out for: corn syrup, cane sugar, brown sugar, brown sugar syrup, dextrin, dextrose, dried cane syrup, glucose, fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, invert sugar, lactose, maltodextrin, maltose, mannitol, molasses, natural sweeteners, polydextrose, raw sugar, sucrose syrup, turbinado sugar, xylitol, organic evaporated cane juice, evaporated cane juice, evaporated cane juice crystals, evaporated cane sugar and maple syrup.
 
 —Not For the Carb-Minded: Researchers have demonstrated that a “low-carbohydrate diet was more effective for weight loss and cardiovascular risk-factor reduction than the low-fat diet.”  The participants in this particular study ate fewer than 40g of carbs per day. The average cereal has more than 30g.
 
 Don’t be Fooled by Health Claims on the Package:  Yes, cereals are nutritionally dense and can be very filling—especially the ones made from whole grains. However, just because they have extra vitamins and minerals doesn't mean you can eat as much as you want. Even if a cereal boasts "High Fiber," "Excellent Source of Calcium" or "Organic," it may still contain a significant amount of sugar, sodium, calories and even fat. 
 
Serving Size Matters: Typically, we eat anywhere from 1 to 3 cups of cereal at one sitting— not necessarily the serving size listed on the food label. Because of this, you need to closely monitor how much you're eating so you don't go overboard.
 
If you want to compare cereals nutritionally, keep in mind that they have different densities (e.g., flakes, nuggets, puffs), and, as a result, it's more difficult to compare one with another. Some, such as Shredded Wheat or Grape Nuts, are quite dense, so, based on the food label, they look like they're very high in calories. Therefore, based simply on volume (number of cups) it's tough to compare their nutritional values to less dense cereals like Rice Krispies or Cheerios.
 
In theory, the more dense the cereal (the more grams per serving), the less you are likely to eat. So, when you're trying to pick the best cereal, check the weights listed next to the serving size (grams) and compare the calories per gram by dividing the calories by the number of grams per serving. 
 
— Skim It: Choose skim milk to go with your cereal. You get essentially the same nutrients from skim milk as you do from drinking whole milk—minus the fat, of course—so stick with the low-calorie version and save about 64 calories and 8 grams of fat per cup. The carb contents are similar: Skim is slightly higher, but by less than half a gram.
 
— Added Fiber:  Many cereals have added fiber; check the label for chicory root/inulin, maltodextrin, polydextrose, soy hulls, wheat fiber, oat fibers and sorghum fibers. Many researchers believe that added fiber doesn’t have the same health benefits as the fiber that occurs naturally in whole foods. Bottom line: Don’t just look at the amount of fiber on the food label; you also need to check the ingredients list.
 
— The Fewer Ingredients the Better:  Choose the cereals (and all your foods) that have the fewest ingredients, and make sure they’re names you can pronounce.
 
— Avoided Added Protein:  Cereal companies are trying their best to overcome the low-carb craze and capitalize on the idea that protein keeps you full, by adding protein to cereal. Don’t be fooled: It’s not the same as eating eggs or egg whites and other low-calorie protein sources. However, cereals with nuts are a great source of protein.
 
— Whole Grains are Important:  Look for whole grains as the first ingredient on the food label.  These could include brown rice, buckwheat, bulgur, graham flour, oatmeal, quinoa, rolled oats, whole-grain barley, whole-grain corn, whole oats, whole rye, whole wheat and wild rice.
 
— Avoid “Fortified with Vitamins”: Research is demonstrating that adding vitamins to cereals is not the same as getting them from whole foods. Looking for vitamin C? Eat an apple. 

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

 THINGS YOUR MOTHER SHOULD HAVE TOLD YOU!!

I did not know about all of these!

1. Stuff a miniature marshmallow in the bottom of a sugar cone to prevent ice cream drips.

2. Use a meat baster to “squeeze” your pancake batter onto the hot griddle and you’ll get perfectly shaped pancakes every time....

3. To keep potatoes from budding, place an apple in the bag with the potatoes.

4. To prevent eggshells from cracking, add a pinch of salt to the water before hard-boiling.

5. Run your hands under cold water before pressing Rice Krispies treats in the pan and the marshmallow won’t stick to your fingers.

6. To get the most juice out of fresh lemons, bring them to room temperature and roll them under your palm against the kitchen counter before squeezing.

7. To easily remove burnt on food from your skillet, simply add a drop or two of dish soap and enough water to cover bottom of pan, and bring to a boil on the stovetop.

8. Spray your Tupperware with nonstick cooking spray before pouring in tomato-based sauces and there won’t be any stains.

9. When a cake recipe calls for flouring the baking pan, use a bit of the dry cake mix instead and there won’t be any white mess on outside of the cake.

10. If you accidentally over-salt a dish while it’s still cooking, drop in a peeled potato and it will absorb the excess salt for an instant “fix me up.”

11. Wrap celery in aluminum foil when putting in the refrigerator and it will keep for weeks.
13. Place a slice of apple in hardened brown sugar to soften it.

14. When boiling corn on the cob, add a pinch of sugar to help bring out the corn’s natural sweetness.

15. To determine whether an egg is fresh, immerse it in a pan of cool, salted water. If it sinks, it is fresh, but if it rises to the surface, throw it away.

16. Cure for headaches: Take a lime, cut it in half and rub it on your forehead. The throbbing will go away.

17. Don’t throw out all that leftover wine: Freeze into ice cubes for future use in casseroles and sauces.

18. If you have a problem opening jars: Try using latex dishwashing gloves. They give a non-slip grip that makes opening jars easy.

19. Potatoes will take food stains off your fingers. Just slice and rub raw potato on the stains and rinse with water.

20. To get rid of itch from mosquito bites, try applying soap on the area and you will experience instant relief.

21. Ants, ants, ants everywhere … Well, they are said to never cross a chalk line. So get your chalk out and draw a line on the floor or wherever ants tend to march. See for yourself.

22. Now look what you can do with Alka Seltzer:

-Clean a toilet. Drop in two Alka-Seltzer tablets, wait twenty minutes, brush and flush. The citric acid and effervescent action clean vitreous china. 

-Clean a vase. To remove a stain from the bottom of a glass vase or cruet, fill with water and drop in two Alka-Seltzer tablets. 

-Polish jewelry. Drop two Alka-Seltzer tablets into a glass of water and immerse the jewelry for two minutes. 

-Clean a thermos bottle. Fill the bottle with water, drop in four Alka-Seltzer tablets, and let soak for an hour (or longer, if necessary). 

-Unclog a drain. Clear the sink drain by dropping three Alka-Seltzer tablets down the drain followed by a cup of Heinz White Vinegar. Wait a few minutes, then run the hot water.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Spicy Potato Soup




 Spicy Potato Soup

Ingredients:...
1 pound garlic breakfast sausage (add more if you desire)
1 onion, chopped
4 cups water
1 1/2 teaspoons ground black pepper
4 cups cubed potatoes
3 (8 ounce) cans tomato sauce
2 teaspoons salt
hot pepper sauce to your taste(I used Tabasco)
Directions:
Brown the sausage and onion, then drain.
Add water, pepper, potatoes, tomato sauce, salt, and Tabasco sauce.
Bring to boil, turn down and simmer until potatoes are tender and soup is thick.
Garnish with chives, sour cream and some bacon bits and enjoy!

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Salves Are Coming Back This Fall

What have I been working on the past couple of days, well I have had many request to get my salves back so I am working on those. I will have Lemon Balm Salve,  Calendula Salve, Herbal and Lavender Salve. You will have a choice of either vegan with Carnauba Wax or with Beeswax.

I am also working on Shea and Goats Milk Body Wash. I use to have just the Goats Milk Body was available a couple of years ago but I will be adding Shea Butter to it.

I will also have other body washes available too. I am also working on a new recipe for our sugar scrubs so they will be back again soon as well.

Thanks for stopping by and you can find us on Facebook and like us for more updates, sales and coupons codes.

Thank you for stopping by
Michelle
www.pegasussoaps.com




Thursday, September 11, 2014

Homemade Nutri-Grain Bars


homemade nutrigrain barsNutri-Grain Bars
Make your own Nutrigrain-style fruit bars for a quick breakfast or snack for the kids during the busy weekdays.

You'll Need:
1 cup butter, softened
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 cup all purpose flour
1/2 cup almond meal/ flour (substitute plain flour if needed)
1 1/2 cup of oats
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 teaspoon almond extract

1 Jar of Jam or Preserves (Fig, Strawberry, Raspberry, Blackberry, blueberry, etc)

Combine all of the ingredients in a bowl, mixing well. Spread half of the mixture into a 9"x9" baking dish that has been buttered, spread a layer of your favorite jam on top, crumble the remaining half of the mixture on top of the jam (It will form a "bar" top when it bakes) Bake at 375F for 20-25 minutes. Cool & cut into squares.

Nutrition Data


Nutri-Grain Bars (The Quickie Version)
1 pkg yellow cake mix
3/4 cup butter
2 1/2 cups quick oats
12 ounces preserves or jam
1 T water

Preheat oven to 375. Melt butter. Combine cake mix and oats in a large bowl; stir in the melted butter until the mixture is crumbly. Measure half of this mixture (about 3 cups) into a greased 13x9x2-inch pan. Press firmly into pan to cover the bottom.

Combine preserves and water; spoon over crumb mixture in pan, and spread evenly. Cover with
remaining crumb mixture. Pat firmly to make top even. Bake at 375 for 20 minutes--top should be very light brown. Cool completely before cutting into bars. 

Nutrition Data

Recipe provide by Budget101.com